Opinion: A different way of explaining micronationalism to others

I think we’ve all had an issue at one point or another, explaining micronationalism to those who don’t belong to the community, let alone who’ve never heard of it before. In many instances the concept is compared to roleplay and make-believe.

You can try explaining in many ways, including statements such as, “We have the right to claim independence”, or “America did it from Great Britain, so we can too.” and so on and so forth, however those statements typically leave you with eye brow raising individuals, or self-declared scholars, giving references to international laws, the United Nations, recognition requirements, etc.

I have a close friend who just couldn’t wrap his head around the idea of micronationalism. I would send our news, images, events, and other things to him, mainly due to the fact that he was a citizen and joined out of respect to our friendship. The issue with that was the fact that he joined something he didn’t understand, something I feel many micronational citizens do.

What started as a simple conversation ended in debate and frustration towards one another. I’d explain how micronationalism was more of a political statement than an ideology, but he’d find ways to pick apart my rebuttals. After explaining micronations having a purpose and reason for existing, he began to come around, using references to better understand the whole picture of this unique community.

“Ah, so in concept, it is kinda like the Masonic lodge, which had its own membership protocols and rites and rituals and oaths… and a particular ideology among its members who each had their own role to play in the transformation of the world, according to the communal will of its members?” my friend asked. I had honestly never thought of this comparison before, but after thinking it over, it was accurate to me.

“Just taking the playbook from macro-nations” I replied. “So in essence, the Masonic lodge was a first micronation. Of course they couldn’t call themselves any kind of nation, for fear of the kings.” my friend stated. His understanding began to take shape more and more as the conversation went on.

I was pretty glad to finally hear an explanation that could finally not be argued, as far as I was concerned. Micronationalism is such a unique part of life, that it can be difficult to explain it to those who’ve never fully experienced it. Its concept isn’t explained on the news, in schools, or any other area for that matter. In order to understand, you have to WANT to understand it.

“The opinions I at first expressed about micronations being perceived by the public as roleplaying games could actually be quite useful from a secretive revolutionary standpoint, I suppose.” my friend stated. “Forming alliances with like-minded micronations could be equivalent to the different lodges associated with the Masonic grand lodge, I’d suppose. Of course this association with historical Freemasonry would only apply if there were a shared revolutionary goal as was historically true of the Freemasons. The analogy does help me to comprehend this otherwise quite nebulous subject.” he ended.

Not everyone may agree with this approach, or this view on explaining micronationalism, but in my case it certainly helped ease the understanding and void out the previous mockery and laughing I had received. I’m sure there are even better ways of explaining it, however given the fact that this community has a hard time being received in a positive or serious light, there can never be too many ways of explaining who we are and what we are doing.